Forex Broker mit OCO Orders 2020 - TopBrokers.com

Forex Trading Lessons: A Must For Forex Beginners

Forex Trading Lessons: A Must For Forex Beginners
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Free Forex Trading Course

Complete Currency Trader is the brainchild of James Edward, founder & CEO. It uses a system that professional traders use. Most courses analyse currency pairs but CCT examines the forex marketplace as a whole and matches strong currencies against weak currencies.
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White Label Cryptocurrency Exchange

White Label Cryptocurrency Exchange. Everyone can rent and own their exchange platform. The world's first cryptocurrency network with sharing orders between trading platforms.
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What Are Forex Orders?

As you begin to learn the fundamentals of Forex trading, you'll need to learn what an order is. In day trading, Forex orders are used by traders to enter and exit the market, and they help provide controls over how trades are placed. There are many different types. Some orders are rules-based, enabling a trader to enter the market when prices are at specific levels, while others enable traders to enter or exit the market at the current price.
There are five types that are almost universally offered by brokers, as well as some lesser known trade orders. Beginning day traders must learn how each trade order works and the situations in which each order should be used. Here's a look at the five most common:
  1. Market Orders: Market orders are used by traders to enter or exit the market immediately. Essentially, the trader enters or exits at the current price, and if the market moves against his or her position, it would result in a loss if the position was closed.
  2. Limit Orders: Limit orders are rules-based, with the rules being set by the trader. Most commonly, limit orders are used to enter the market when the exchange rate for a currency pair reaches a certain value. They are considered "pending" until the rules are met and the trade is filled. If you are going long, your limit order would be slightly above the market value, and if you were selling short, the order would be slightly below. For example, if you believe GBP/USD is moving into an uptrend from 1.5000, you might set a limit order to enter at 1.5020.
  3. Take Profit Orders: Traders often set up trades but cannot sit back and monitor the movement of the market. Take profit orders are used to automatically close a trade when the exchange rate has reached a profitable value for the trader. For example, if you enter EUUSD at 1.0600 and want to take a profit if the market reaches 1.0700, you would set a take profit order for 1.0700. By setting these orders, traders are able to lock in profits.
  4. Stop Loss Orders: The opposite of a take profit order is the stop loss. A stop loss order - which is sometimes referred to as an exit order - is used to automatically close a trade if the market moves against the trader's position. This is a defensive mechanism that allows a trader to cap the amount of loss incurred. For example, if you go long on GBP/USD at 1.0500, you could set a stop loss at 1.0400. If the market moves against your position, the trade would be closed once the exchange rate reached 1.0400. Without a stop loss order in place, though, your losses in this trade could quickly add up if the market continued in a downward trend.
  5. Trailing Stop Orders: Trailing stop orders are similar to stop losses, but there is one key difference. With a trailing stop, the trader sets a stop price benchmark. The trade will automatically close if the exchange rate reaches this stop price. But there is also a trailing amount attached to the stop order price. So if the market moves in a positive direction, the stop price rises by the trail amount. For instance, if you go long in a position, you would set a specific stop price below the current market rate. As the market rises, so too will your stop price. If the market moves against your position, though, the stop price remains unchanged.
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Forex Orders 101

u/OK-Face made a post with some questions about limits and stop orders. I started to write up a big comment but then figured I’d just create an “Orders 101” post in case other newbies might find it useful. If you don’t like massive walls of text, now is the time to leave!
The very basics
First you need to know a little about forex market makers. A market maker publishes two prices: the bid price (lower) and the ask price (higher). The market maker will sell you units of a currency pair at the higher ask price, and will buy units of a currency pair back from you at the lower bid price. They make money by buying units at the bid from one user and selling those units at the ask to another user, pocketing the difference.
The difference between the bid and the ask is called the spread. A narrow spread is good for users. If you buy at the ask (or sell at the bid) you only need the bid (ask) to move upwards (downwards) a little bit before you can sell (buy) back to the market maker to close the position for a profit. The spread will vary over time; the market maker wants to keep it narrow to compete for customers but wide enough to ensure they make money even when the market moves unexpectedly. When the market is stable the spread will be narrow; when the market is volatile the spread will be wide.
When someone refers to the price of a currency pair you can usually infer which price (the bid or the ask) they are referring to from the context. If they’re talking about going long (buying) then they are probably referencing the ask. If they are talking about going short (selling) then they are probably referencing the bid. Broker software usually allows you to plot both at the same time, which visualizes not only the prices by the spread (and thus the market maker’s measure of volatility).
The “market price” or “mark” is the midpoint between the bid and ask. It’s sometimes used when charting prices, since it smoothes out changes in the spread.
The details of where the bid and ask prices come from, how they differ between market makers and from inter-bank rates, and how they are related to but very different from bid/ask spreads on exchange-traded instruments like stocks are all well beyond the scope of this post. (But you should learn it eventually!)
Opening and closing a position
First, burn it into your brain that a long position is opened by buying from the market maker at the ask and closed by selling back to the market maker at the bid, while a short position is opened by selling to the market maker at the bid and closed by buying back from the market maker at the ask.
(Really a short position is a loan from the market maker that you can satisfy with units of currency pairs bought back from them at a later time. But whatever.)
When you open a new position you use one of two types of orders: a market order or a limit order.
A market order tells the market maker to fill your order as soon as your order gets to the front of the queue, no matter what the price is. If it’s a market buy to go long on a pair then the order will be filled at the ask price. If it’s a market sell to go short on a pair then the order will be filled at the bid price. The time it takes your order to get to the front of the queue is usually less than a second, but the price could change pretty dramatically in that second. A market order says “I don’t care what happens to the price between now and then, just fill my order as quickly as possible.”
A limit order goes through the order queue too, but when it reaches the front it tells the market maker to wait to fill your order until an acceptable (to you) price is available. If it’s a limit buy to go long on a pair then you specify the maximum ask price you are willing to pay. If it’s a limit sell to go short on a pair then you specify the minimum bid price you are willing to accept. If the price is already acceptable then the order is filled immediately just like a market order, otherwise it waits until it’s filled or canceled.
When you close a position you can also choose a market order or a limit order. If you have a long position then you can either submit a market sell order or a limit sell order to sell back your units at the bid. If you have a short position then you can either submit a market buy order or a limit buy order to buy back the units you shorted at the ask. These orders work just like orders to open a position, but instead of creating a new position they cancel out your existing position. (Hopefully leaving you with a profit.)
It is possible to submit offsetting orders that don’t actually cancel out one another! For example, a market maker may allow you to submit a market buy order to go long one lot of EUUSD and then separately submit a market sell order to go short one lot of EUUSD, and track those two positions separately rather than cancel them out. For this reason an order used to close out a position is sometimes clarified as “to close”, as in “market sell to close”. Most users will close positions by right-clicking the position in their broker’s GUI and click “close” (or something similar); this will automatically submit a market order (buy or sell) to close. Submitting a limit order to close may take more clicks.
Conditional orders to close
When you create an order you can attach conditional orders to close that are only submitted if the bid or ask price moves past a trigger price. You specify the trigger price and the type of order to be submitted when the trigger hits: market or limit. There are four possible combinations, but only three are commonly used.
A conditional market order to close a losing position is called a stop-loss order.
A conditional limit order to close a losing position is called a stop-limit order.
A conditional market order to close a winning position doesn’t have a name and isn’t commonly used.
A conditional limit order to close a winning position is called a take-profit order.
Generally the trigger price is compared to the price (bid or ask) that will be used to close the position. For example, a long position is closed by selling at the bid, so the trigger price for a stop-loss on a long position will be compared to the bid. Some market makers will allow you to get fancy and decide which price your trigger is compared to, which may be useful if, for example, your strategy is entirely based on the ask price but you want to use a conditional order to close a long position without worrying about the spread.
Let’s look at the three common conditional orders to close, from simplest to confusing.
Stop-loss orders
A stop-loss order is a conditional market order to close a losing position. The trigger price is set on the losing side of the position. When the bid/ask price passes the trigger price, a new market order is created to close the position. Like any market order, it is filled at whatever the bid/ask price is when the order makes it to the front of the queue.
For a long position the trigger price is less than the original ask price at which the currency pair was bought. A long position is closed by selling at the bid, so the trigger price is usually compared to the bid. When the bid price falls down to the trigger price a new market sell (to close) order is submitted. When it reaches the front of the queue it’s filled at the current bid, offsetting the position.
For a short position the trigger price is greater than the original bid price at which the currency pair was sold short. A short position is closed by buying at the ask, so the trigger price is usually compared to the ask. When the ask price rises up to the trigger price a new market buy (to close) order is submitted. When it reaches the front of the queue it’s filled at the current ask, offsetting the position.
Stop-loss orders are used as a last resort: “If my losses get too big close the position as fast as possible, even if that means closing at a less advantageous price.” It’s not uncommon for the bid/ask price to shoot past the trigger price so quickly that the price at which the position closes is quite a bit worse than the trigger price. On the other hand, it’s also not uncommon for the price to just barely touch the trigger price (triggering the placement of the market order to close) and bounce back, so that the price at which the position closes is better than the target price. (This latter scenario can sometimes make people wonder why the position was closed, since it may appear that the price never reached the trigger.)
Take-profit orders
A take-profit order is a conditional limit order to close a winning position. The trigger price is set on the winning side of the position. When the bid/ask price passes the trigger price, a new limit order is created to close the position. Like any limit order, it is only filled when the bid/ask price is better for the customer than the specified limit price.
The limit price for a take-profit order is usually the same as the trigger price. (Some market makers may allow it to be different.)
For a long position the trigger (and limit) price is greater than the original ask price at which the currency pair was bought. A long position is closed by selling at the bid, so the trigger price is usually compared to the bid. When the bid price rises up to the trigger price a new limit buy (to close) order is submitted. When it reaches the front of the queue it waits until the current bid is at least equal to the limit price, then it fills and offsets the position.
For a short position the trigger (and limit) price is less than the original bid price at which the currency pair was sold short. A short position is closed by buying at the ask, so the trigger price is usually compared to the ask. When the ask price falls down to the trigger price a new limit sell (to close) order is submitted. When it reaches the front of the queue it waits until the current ask is at most equal to the limit price, then it fills and offsets the position.
Since the limit price is usually set equal to the trigger price, and since the bid/ask price doesn’t usually reverse within the short time while the new order (to close) moves through the queue, a take-profit order usually closes almost immediately after being triggered, at a price at or very slightly above the triggelimit price. However it is possible that the bid/ask price just touched the trigger price and immediately reverses, leaving the limit order (to close) pending on the queue until the price moves favorably again.
Stop-limit orders
Finally we come to the confusing one. A stop-limit order is a conditional limit order to close a losing position. The trigger price is set on the losing side of the position. When the bid/ask price passes the trigger price, a new limit order is created to close the position. Like any limit order, it is only filled when the bid/ask price is better for the customer than the specified limit price.
Unlike a take-profit order, the limit price for a stop-limit order is usually not the same as the trigger price.
For a long position the trigger (and limit) price is less than the original ask price at which the currency pair was bought. A long position is closed by selling at the bid, so the trigger price is usually compared to the bid. When the bid price falls down to the trigger price a new limit sell (to close) order is submitted. When it reaches the front of the queue it waits until the current bid is at least equal to the limit price, then it fills and offsets the position.
For a short position the trigger (and limit) price is greater than the original bid price at which the currency pair was sold short. A short position is closed by buying at the ask, so the trigger price is usually compared to the ask. When the ask price rises up to the trigger price a new limit buy (to close) order is submitted. When it reaches the front of the queue it waits until the current ask is at most equal to the limit price, then it fills and offsets the position.
On first blush this appears to be the opposite of a take-profit order, but it behaves quite differently. Take a long position for example, and consider what happens when the bid price moves quickly down past the trigger and continues to fall. The limit sell order (to close) is submitted but suppose the limit is set close to the trigger price. Since the bid is still falling it’s on the wrong side of the limit price (for the customer) so the limit order won’t fill. A stop-limit order says “If I’m losing money and the price moves to X, try to close my position, but don’t accept anything too much worse than X.”
Because a rapid price movement may pass both the trigger and the limit, the limit needs to be set carefully to give a little “breathing room” for the limit in case of rapid price movement.
Stop-limit orders require careful calculation of triggers and limits to fix risk, or you can end up closing a position early, too late, or not at all!
Final thoughts
I hope you learned something! At the very least, I hope some newbies see that setting stop-losses, stop-limits, and take-profits involves a lot more math and understanding of the mechanics of the market than thinking “this looks like a good place to limit my losses” and clicking the mouse.
Corrections are highly appreciated! I intentionally glossed over a ton of details but if in doing so I omitted something important please let me know!
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OANDA Forex Order Book - A 24-hour summary of open orders and positions held by OANDA's clients

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Different Types of Forex Orders You Need to Know About to Control the Trades

Different Types of Forex Orders You Need to Know About to Control the Trades submitted by Rufflenator to 3bitcoins [link] [comments]

Different Types of Forex Orders You Need to Know About to Control the Trades

Different Types of Forex Orders You Need to Know About to Control the Trades submitted by ososru to Bitcoin4free [link] [comments]

Different Types of Forex Orders You Need to Know About to Control the Trades

Different Types of Forex Orders You Need to Know About to Control the Trades submitted by Hellterskelt to bitcoin_is_dead [link] [comments]

What is a Limit Forex Order?

A Limit Forex Order is an order to buy or sell at a specified price or a better price than the specified price.
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Forex Order Flow

So with the knowledge of how markets work and how they're handled by dealers - I found this flick off someones trading room on forex order flow.
Knowing where orders are being executed from all dealers and brokers (Fxpro, Exness, Alpari, etc etc) listed in that video basically tells the direction the price is heading upfront.. Has anyone tried this - and is it legal?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j2a7dPTQJlI
*forgot the link! Cheers
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Forex Order Types Explained - Different Types of Forex Orders

submitted by Ayan_B to Forextrader [link] [comments]

Forex Order Types Explained – Different Types of Forex Orders

Forex Order Types Explained – Different Types of Forex Orders submitted by Ayan_B to u/Ayan_B [link] [comments]

Which Forex Order Type Should You Use, Market or Pending?

Which Forex Order Type Should You Use, Market or Pending? submitted by dailypriceaction to ForexPriceAction [link] [comments]

Forex Order Types

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Forex Orders:There is a large diversity of types of orders and here we will cover most of them.

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One year resume. Live testing before backtesting.

Hello,
I‘m on this algotrading journey starting with crypto for exactly one year now. My strategies have not been profitable yet. I have programmed my bot, teached it all the technical indicators I got to know myself first, have left it live trading and losing half of its assigned budget. I‘ve read alot about backtesting on this forum and started learning this wierd pine script language on Tradingview. I got good looking backtest results based on some simple RSI/MACD scripts. The bot got some fresh budget assigned to lose some of it again. Leaving it running for three months the blue backtest profit hill is slowly turning red as well in the meantime. Overfitted to the max obviously. I tried implementing my own backtester to add some machine learning to even more overfit the overfitted values. I somehow left it in the dark for now and have never used it for live trading yet reading so much about overfitted backtesting within this sub.
Since two months I have now completely stopped using backtesting due to this disappointing experience and completely went towards paper trading (using virtual budget on my bot). I have also tried to minimize usage of technical indicators because of the lagging. I consider all the coins instead of only BTC now. The price action is clearly linked to BTC tho (very visible!). Managing my (virtual) budget and allocation towards trades is a big learning for me as well.
I slightly look into backtesting again to validate my strategies. Still not profitable but won‘t give up there. I feel heavy doubts sometimes using it but it gives back hope as well.
How do you balance your efforts from backtesting compared to live/paper trading?
With my full time job I have somehow developed a ritual when coming home the first thing in wifi range is checking the paper trades that my bot has done over the day. Most often re-writing the whole strategy due to bad performance. I need to get more patient on that. Next I want to read more about Forex. Ordered my first book about it yesterday.
Just wanted to share my story. Hope it can motivate or helps in some way.
submitted by 26oclock to algotrading [link] [comments]

6 Price Action Retracement Entry Types You Need To Know

You've presumably heard "retracement" or "follow" much of the time in case you're keen on exchanging the monetary business sectors. Be that as it may, do you really understand what value retracements are, the reason they're so significant and how to appropriately exploit them? Maybe not, yet regardless of whether you do, the present exercise will reveal new insight into how to use these incredibly amazing business sector occasions…
A retracement in a market is a pretty simple idea to characterize and comprehend. Basically, it's actually what it seems like: a period when cost remembers back on an ongoing move, either up or down. Consider "remembering your means"; returning a similar way you came. It's fundamentally an inversion of an ongoing value move.
For what reason are retracements significant? For various reasons: They are occasions to enter the market at a "superior value", they take into account ideal stop misfortune arrangement, improved danger prize and then some. A remember passage is more traditionalist than a "market section" for instance and is viewed as a "more secure" passage type. Eventually, the objective of a dealer is get the best passage cost and oversee hazard on a par with conceivable while additionally expanding restores; the retracement section is a device that permits you to do every one of the three of these things.
This exercise will cover all parts of exchanging retracements and will assist you with understanding them better and put them to use to ideally improve your general exchanging execution.
Presently, how about we examine a portion of the Pros and Cons of retracement exchanging before we take a gander at some model graphs…
Professionals of Retracement Trading
We should discuss a portion of the many "Geniuses" of retracement exchanging. Frankly, retracement exchanging is fundamentally how you exchange like an expert rifleman, which, on the off chance that you've followed me for any timeframe, you know is my favored strategy for exchanging.
Higher Probability Entries – The very idea of a draw back or backtrack implies that cost is probably going to keep moving toward the underlying move when the follow closes. Henceforth, on the off chance that you see a solid value activity signal at a level after a retracement, it's high-likelihood passage since all signs are highlighting value bobbing starting there. Presently, it doesn't generally occur, however hanging tight for a remember to a level with a sign, is the most elevated likelihood way you can exchange. Markets pivot back to the "signify" or "normal" cost again and again; this is clear by taking a gander at any value outline for a couple of moments. Along these lines, when you see this revolution or backtrack occur, begin searching for a section point there in light of the fact that it's a lot higher-likelihood passage point than just entering "at market" like most brokers do.
Less Premature Stop-Outs – A retracement permits greater adaptability with stop misfortune arrangement. Essentially, in that you can put the prevent further away from any territory on the diagram that is probably going to be hit (if the exchange you're taking is to exercise by any stretch of the imagination). Setting prevents further away from key levels or moving midpoints or further away from a pin bar high or low for instance, gives the exchange a higher possibility of working out.
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Better Risk Rewards – Retracement passages hypothetically permit you to put a "more tight" stop misfortune on an exchange since you're entering more like a key level or you're entering at a pin bar half level on an exchange section stunt passage for instance. In this way, should you decide to do as such, you can put a stop a lot nearer than if you entered an exchange that didn't occur after a follow or on the off chance that you entered a pin bar exchange at the high or low of the pin, for instance. Model: a 100 pip stop and 200 pip target can undoubtedly turn into a 50 pip stop and 250 pip focus on a follow passage. Note: you don't have to put a more tight stop, it's discretionary, however the choice IS There on a backtrack section in the event that you need it. The other option, utilizing a standard width stop has the benefit of diminishing the odds of an untimely stop out.
A danger prize can likewise be somewhat expanded regardless of whether you utilize a standard stop misfortune, rather than a "more tight one". Model: a 100 pip stop and a 200 pip target can without much of a stretch become a 100 pip stop and a 250 pip target. Why? This is on the grounds that a remember passage lets you enter the market when it has "more space" to run toward you, because of the way that cost has pulled back and it consequently has more separation to move before it follows again when contrasted with in the event that you entered at a "more awful cost" further up or down.
Cons of Retracement Trading
Obviously I will be straightforward with you and told you a portion of the "cons" of retracement exchanging, there are a not many that you ought to know about. Notwithstanding, this doesn't mean you shouldn't attempt to learn retracement exchanging and add it to your exchanging "tool stash", in light of the fact that the geniuses FAR exceed the cons.
More Missed Trades: Good exchanges will "move away" now and then when hanging tight for a retracement that doesn't occur, for instance. This can test your nerves and exchanging attitude and will bother even the best dealers. In any case, trust me, passing up exchanges isn't the most exceedingly terrible thing on the planet and it's smarter to pass up certain exchanges than to over-exchange, that is without a doubt.
Less Trades in General – A great deal of the time, advertises just don't remember enough to trigger the more moderate passage that returns with a force. All things being equal, they may simply prop up with insignificant retracements. This implies you will have less opportunities to exchange by and large when contrasted with somebody who isn't essentially hanging tight for follows.
Because of the over two focuses, retracement exchanging can be disappointing and takes unimaginable order. In any case, in the event that you build up this order you'll be WELL in front of the majority of losing dealers thus retracement exchanging can assist you with building up the control you should need to prevail at exchanging regardless of what passage technique you wind up utilizing.
Retracements Provide Flexibility in Stop Loss Placements
Setting your stop misfortune at some unacceptable point can get you taken out of an exchange rashly, that you in any case were spot on. By figuring out how to sit tight for market pull backs or retracements, you won't just enter the market at a higher-likelihood point, however you'll likewise have the option to put your stop misfortune at a lot more secure point on the diagram.
Regularly, dealers get debilitate in light of the fact that they get halted out of an exchange that actually they were spot on. Putting a stop misfortune at some unacceptable point on a diagram can get you removed from an exchange before the market truly gets an opportunity to get moving toward you. A retracement presents a clever answer for this issue by permitting you to put a more secure and more extensive stop misfortune on an exchange, giving you a superior possibility at bringing in cash on that exchange.
At the point when a market follows or pulls back, particularly inside a moving business sector, it is giving you an occasion to put your stop misfortune at a point on the outline that is significantly more averse to take you out of an exchange. Since most remembers occur into help or opposition levels, you can put the stop misfortune further past that level (more secure) which is fundamentally less inclined to be hit than if it was nearer to the level. Utilizing what I call a "standard" stop misfortune (not a tight one) in this case will give you the most obvious opportunity at keeping away from an untimely take out of an exchange.
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10 Secrets The Trading Industry Doesn’t Want You To Know About

Today’s lesson goes to be somewhat controversial and should ruffle some feathers. I shall blow wide open and debunk tons of the knowledge you've got presumably been exposed to the present far in your trading journey.
The average trader is out there walking through a confusing and conflicting maze of data from a spread of sources including; blogs, forums, broker websites, books, e-books, courses and YouTube videos.
With of these learning resources available there's naturally getting to be some excellent and a few very bad information, but actually , there just isn’t how for many aspiring traders to understand what to concentrate to, who to concentrate to, or what information is useful and what information is non-beneficial.
I’m not getting to pretend that there's how for an aspiring trader to filter this giant sea of data composed by of these resources and mentors out there, because there simply isn’t. knowledgeable trader with 10,000 hours of experience might stand an opportunity of deciding the great from the bad and therefore the valid from the invalid. However, you, the beginner or intermediate trader simply won’t possess that filtering ability yet.
Becoming ‘Non-Average’
As traders, we concede to our instinctive feelings of social trustworthiness supported what we see and listen to , often to our extreme detriment. we frequently tend to require a leap of religion with our mentors and have a habit of taking things said to us at face value. we would like to hold close information that resonates with us and is sensible to us, especially if it’s delivered by a well-known source that we've come to understand and trust.
The ‘average trader’s brain’ is usually trying to find a shortcut due to the overwhelming desire to form money and be free. The brain wants to urge a winning result immediately with the smallest amount amount of effort possible. If you would like to ever make it as a professional trader or investor, I suggest you are doing everything you'll to avoid thinking with the ‘average trader’s brain‘ and begin being ‘non-average’. meaning becoming far more aware, thinking outside the box more and questioning and filtering the knowledge you read and watch. most significantly , slowing everything all down!
This now begs the apparent question…how does one even know what I’m close to write during this lesson is actually valid and factual? How are you able to really be sure? the reality is unless you've got followed me and my posts on this blog for an extended time and know me and know my work, then you can’t really make certain , and that i don’t expect you to easily believe it at face value. If you would like to return back and re-read this lesson during a few weeks, or a couple of months, or a couple of years, after you work out that i'm somebody worth taking note of about trading OR that i'm somebody not worth taking note of about trading, then so be it.
So with a degree of healthy skepticism, I ask you to think about the below list of eye-opening secrets that professional traders and therefore the trading industry, don’t want you to understand about or understand. I hope it helps…
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FOREX isn’t the sole market the Professionals trade
The FX market is large , with billions of dollars per day changing hands. It can cause you to great money if you recognize what you’re doing OR it can send you broke if you don’t. It’s a really popular market to trade globally, BUT it’s not the sole market the professional’s trade and it’s not always the simplest market to trade either.
A note on leverage:
The brokers and platform providers want you to trade FX on high leverage because the profit margins are very high for them. However, if you trade FX on lower leverage, the profit margins shrink dramatically for them. once you trade FX, start brooding about what can fail rather than just brooding about what can go right. I suggest avoiding stupidly high leverage like 400 to 1, as this will be very dangerous for you if the market moves quickly or experiences a price gap and your stop-loss orders aren’t executed at the worth you set. A more sensible leverage level would be 100 to 1 or 200 to 1, but any higher seems crazy. (Using an excessive amount of leverage is what wiped tons of traders out during Swiss Bank Crisis in 2015, The Brexit choose 2016 and therefore the Currency flash crash in early 2019).
Broaden your view:
Going forward, it'll serve you well in your trading career to start out watching a spread of worldwide markets including FX, Stock Indicies and Commodities. additionally to FX, I personally trade GOLD (XAUUSD), S&P500 Index USA, the SPI200 Index Australia, and therefore the Hang Seng Index Hong Kong , and sometimes individual stocks on various global exchanges. In short, there's more to the trading world than simply FX. I discuss the foremost popular markets I trade this lesson here.
Day trading isn’t what Pro trading really is
The internet is crammed with marketing trying to convince folks that the definition of a trader may be a one that spends all day actively trading in and out of the market on a brief term basis, all whilst living the life-style of a Wall St millionaire. there's a significant agenda within the industry to push this story to the masses, it's been relentless for many years .
I am yet to satisfy one successful day trader who is consistent over the future and that i have almost 25,000 students and 250,000 readers on this blog. i'm not saying there isn’t a couple of out there, but 99.9% of the people that do this sort of trading or attempt to live up to the standard day trader stereotype are getting to fail and perhaps even harm themselves financially or mentally. Watching a screen all day and searching for trades constantly is that the like a compulsive gambler playing roulette during a casino.
The successful traders i do know of (myself included) are watching higher time frames and longer time horizons (minimum 4-hour chart timeframes and predominantly daily chart time frames). they need no restriction on how long they're looking to carry a trade for and that they tend to let the trades find them. The professionals i do know , don't day trade, they are doing not watch screens all day, they are doing not search for trades constantly. they're going to typically fall under the category of a swing trader, trend trader or position trader.
The obvious paradox and conflicting reality within the ‘day trader story’ is blatantly obvious. How does a trader who is consistently watching a screen and constantly trading have time to enjoy his life and live the lifestyle? They chose to trade as a profession to possess a life, they didn’t choose it to observe a screen 24/5.
Here are some points to think about that employment against the so-called ‘ day trader’:
The shorter the time-frame the more noise and random price movement there's , thus increasing your chance of simply being stopped out of the trade.
Your ‘trading edge’ features a higher chance of yielding a result for you if you’re not trading within the intraday noise.
The same trading edge doesn't work or produce an equivalent results on a 5 min chart compared to a Daily chart.
Commissions and spreads churn your account, therefore the more you trade the more you lose in broker platform costs. (I will mention this below)
Risk-Reward ratios aren't relative on shorter and longer time frames. Statistical average volatility across different time periods also as natural market dynamics play an enormous role during this . there's much more weight behind higher time frames than lower timeframes.
Great trades take time because the market moves slower than most of the people ever anticipate. Trading from the upper timeframes and holding trades for extended time periods will provide you with greater opportunities to ascertain trades mature into big winners. However, shorter timeframes don’t provide you with this same opportunity fairly often .
submitted by LondonForex to u/LondonForex [link] [comments]

Biweekly Trading Update #3: Trading without Indicators

Over the weekend my trading strategy changed drastically. At first I decided to let indicators completely rule my trading strategy; however, I quickly ran into issues with that ideology. My trading turned into gambling, and could easily be replicated by a simple program. To combat this issue I pushed back-testing indicators from the prior weekend to after I solidify my technical, sentimental, and fundamental analysis. I started learning Naked Forex, order flow analysis, and price action analysis over the weekend, and have started practicing them during the weekday. Although my win percentage is fairly low, I found that my analysis is getting stronger with each trade I take.
My first trade was on the 30 min EUUSD chart. I saw that the market was entering an ascending triangle and started to expect a bullish breakout. I looked at the market sentiment on fxdaily, and saw that most of the market was bearish. I assumed that the bearish presence in the market were the retail traders, and assumed that the market would move in the opposite direction of their expectations. I used order flow analysis to find the momentum and projection of the market, and ended up placing a buy stop in order to catch the market on the expected breakout. One thing I did not factor was multiple time frame analysis. I did not see that the market had entered a channel, and that I placed a trade when it had hit the resistance level. The price reached my buy stop, but proceeded to drop until it hit my stop loss.
As I went back to analyze my technical analysis, I found that I misread the order flow. I also realized that there were many parts of technical analysis that I didn't factor in, such as multiple time frame analysis, major support/resistance levels, and Fibonacci levels. I also decided to take more precaution when looking at the market sentiment, and try back-testing that data before basing another trade off of it.
Although this trade was a loser, I still learned a great deal from it, and feel like I benefited more than my previous trades. The chart analysis was tough to begin, but progressively got easier as I looked for more and more trades. For the time being I decided to stick with the EUUSD, and exclusively look for repeating market behavior and reactions in order to strengthen my market sense and improve my technical analysis before I start back-testing and using indicators. I also have started to pay more attention to candlestick patterns and their link to trend behavior.
Overall I believe that improving my technical analysis is a step in the right direction for my trading journey. I finally feel like i'm trading with my own mind rather than being overly reliant on the indicators on my chart.
submitted by Aman-1127 to Forex [link] [comments]

ASIC’s Product Intervention Order Instrument 2020/986. Forex question

The new CFD caps on leverage are a bit confusing. Will it become more difficult to grow your forex account if it’s gone from 1:300 to 1:30 leverage ? I know margin requirements will shoot up and the bar of entry into the industry with it.
Placing multiple trades will become difficult with a smaller account, likewise techniques such as stacking. Am I overreacting ?
submitted by Oblivionking1 to AusFinance [link] [comments]

Unathi Kwaza RT from Tumelo Warona: Felicia Sibeko convinced her husband to sell their Toyota Quantum in order to raise money to invest R130k into Bushiri's forex scheme that was supposed to bring in R1 million in 6 months. She's now blackisted & her child was forced to drop out of varsity due to...

Unathi Kwaza RT from Tumelo Warona: Felicia Sibeko convinced her husband to sell their Toyota Quantum in order to raise money to invest R130k into Bushiri's forex scheme that was supposed to bring in R1 million in 6 months. She's now blackisted & her child was forced to drop out of varsity due to... submitted by TweetArchiveBot to LibertyRSA [link] [comments]

توصيات الذهب اليوم

توصيات الذهب او توصيات الفوركس عبارة عن إشارات يتم اتاحتها للمستخدم ، وهذه الاشارات من خلالها تحصل على اقتراح بالدخول إلى زوج معين من العملات ، أو الحصول على صفقة بعينها ، أو التعرف على وقت معين لسعر عملة ، ولكن قبل تتبع اشارة معينة لابد من التأكد من أن الموقع الذي يوفر هذه الإشارة أو المعلومة موقع موثوق لضمان صحة المعلومة. توصيات الذهب اليوم
submitted by rkhalil to u/rkhalil [link] [comments]

Market orders get filled at wrong price (Forex)

Market orders get filled at wrong price (Forex)
Hello everybody, rookie question here.
Been trying to learn scalping so I'm practising on a demo account. I have opened a demo account at forex.com and connected that broker to tradingview so I can buy and sell directly in Tradingview.
I use Heikin Ashi bars, so I enter on these bars.
However, when I did a market sell, my orders got filled at a price further away from the actual price. I am aware of slippage, I will show a picture, but this doesn't seem like a slippage to me but I could be wrong.
This is the USD/JPY pair, 5 min bars.
What am I missing here?
Also, would you recommend a specifik broker or platform to use when scalping, maybe to get better real time data or faster order execution?
Thanks in advance!
https://preview.redd.it/tehb7aclyhk51.jpg?width=846&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=9efdc0f3821b1f35984f1f293293fd209277bc38
submitted by Mobile-War to Forex [link] [comments]

Some tools free from Onada's site.

I am not associated with Onada in any way, just thought these were interesting and didn't know about them until recently.
Volatility Graph: Zero in on which currency pairs show the most significant price fluctuations over various time periods.
https://www.oanda.com/forex-trading/analysis/currency-volatility
 
Currency Correlation: See how currency pairs have moved relative to each other https://www.oanda.com/forex-trading/analysis/currency-correlation
 
Candlestick Patterns: See candlestick patterns plotted over recent currency movements.
https://www.oanda.com/forex-trading/analysis/candlestick-patterns
 
Currency Strength Heatmap: See the percentage change and rank of each currency relative to other currencies traded against it.
https://www.oanda.com/forex-trading/analysis/currency-heatmap
 
Market Trading Hours: See global forex trading hours and statuses.
https://www.oanda.com/forex-trading/analysis/market-hours
 
Official Economic Figures: Access more than 150 economic figures from the world's major markets.
https://www.oanda.com/forex-trading/analysis/economic-indicators/
 
OANDA Forex Open Position Ratios: A summary of open positions held by OANDA clients
https://www1.oanda.com/forex-trading/analysis/open-position-ratios
 
OANDA Forex Order Book: A 24-hour summary of open orders and positions held by OANDA's clients.
https://www1.oanda.com/forex-trading/analysis/forex-order-book
 
edit: Article about: Using Oanda’s Orderbook To Trade Stop Hunts
https://www.forexmentoronline.com/using-oandas-orderbook-to-trade-stop-hunts/
Again, interesting but i'm just starting out, little to advanced for me right now.
submitted by Oatmeal_or_Porridge to Forex [link] [comments]

Forex Day Trading Strategy: Set Entry Order in Advance ... Trading Forex Order Flow (Simple and Powerful Order Flow ... Types of Forex Orders Types Of Forex Orders Forex Trading : Lesson 9 Types of Orders

Different brokers accept different types of forex orders. Order Types. There are some basic order types that all brokers provide and some others that sound weird. Orders fall into two buckets: Market order: an order instantly executed against a price that your broker has provided. Pending order: an order to be executed at a later time at the price you specify. Here’s a quick “map” of the ... OCO-Orders sind grundsätzlich zwei normale ausstehende Forex-Orders (Stop-Loss und Take-Profit). Gleichzeitig werden sie durch eine automatisierte Abbruchfunktion miteinander verknüpft, wenn eine von ihnen ausgelöst wird. Dadurch haben Sie die Möglichkeit, Gewinne zu fixieren und Verluste zu begrenzen. Die besten Forex Broker, die Aufträge des Typs OCO unterstützen, werden für Sie in ... There are many different types of forex orders, which traders use to manage their trades. While these may vary between different brokers, there tends to be several basic FX order types all brokers ... Get information on the most active forex orders and see FX order book positions and foreign exchange market flows daily. Vergleichen Sie OANDA, offene Aufträge und offene Positionen für alle Hauptwährungspaare. Verwenden Sie den Schieberegler im Kurschart und erfahren Sie, wie sich die Statistiken in den letzten 24 Stunden verändert haben. You can use several different types of orders to make and control your trades in forex trading. Some orders control both how you enter and how you exit the market. Learning what they all mean can go a long way toward successful trading. Market Orders . Market orders are executed live on the market at the current price. You're telling the broker that you don't care about the spread as much as ... There are some important Forex orders you can take advantage of in your trading so that you are able to get the best prices when you enter and exit. In this post we look at the different types of Forex orders and how you can use them in your trading. Market Orders. The most common type of Forex order is the market order. The market order is when you are directly entering the market at the best ...

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Forex Day Trading Strategy: Set Entry Order in Advance ...

Forex Trading for Beginners #6: The Different Types of Forex Orders by Rayner Teo - Duration: 8:26. Rayner Teo 53,234 views. 8:26. How to Trade Fibonacci Retracements - Duration: 8:46. ... Today, I am talking about types of forex orders. During this video you’ll learn what different types of forex orders exists and we’ll explore some of other topics about forex trading. Types Of Forex Orders Trade It Simple. Loading... Unsubscribe from Trade It Simple? ... 95% Winning Forex Trading Formula - Beat The Market Maker📈 - Duration: 37:53. TRADE ATS 1,351,740 views ... Order flow trading in forex is one of the most misunderstood concepts in forex trading. Forex order flow trading is commonly referred to as "tape reading", o... If you are searching for the absolute best most proven Forex day trading strategy, this video shows how to use manual vs. automated entry orders to enable yo...

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